SSI and Children

Children with severe disabilities may be eligible for SSI benefits. Unfortunately, many disability attorneys are unwilling to represent children in Social Security hearings. However, at McCroskey Law, we believe that we are proud to represent children in Social Security hearings.

If your child has been denied SSI benefits, it is important that you speak to a lawyer specializing in Child SSI cases. These cases can be difficult, and expert representation can be the difference between an favorable and unfavorable decision.

How Social Security Defines Childhood Disability

In order to be eligible for SSI, a child must have a medically-determinable impairment (or impairments) that cause marked or severe functional limitations. These impairments should be expected to result in death or last for at least 12 months.

Social Security's child disability standard can be summarized by these questions:

  1. Is the child working?
  2. Does the child have a severe impairment or impairments?
  3. Do the child's impairments meet or functionally equal a Social Security Listing?

Social Security publishes a series of "Listings." These Listings discuss a variety of severe medical and psychological conditions, and set very specific standards for defining disability. In order to win a Child SSI case, it is important that there is medical evidence showing these standards are met.

Child SSI cases can be very complicated and technical. If your child has been denied, it is important that you retain an attorney who specializes in Child SSI. Contact McCroskey Law today, and schedule a free consultation with one of our Child SSI experts.

Child SSI and Financial Eligibility

In order to eligible for SSI benefits, a disabled child must live in a home with limited income and assets.  The Social Security Administration can help you determine if your family qualifies financially for SSI. For more information on income and financial resource requirements, click here.